Tom Ramcigam (magicmarmot) wrote,
Tom Ramcigam
magicmarmot

Among other things done this weekend, I spent some time logging footage. I will tell you that the weirdness that is the JVC file naming specification for Darthcam is one of the more awkwardly thought out ones: the letters MOV followed by a three-digit number. But not any old number, it's in hex.

I'm fine with hex. Unfortunately, Windows XP does something weird in its sort mechanism and doesn't really sort the files in hex order... or really alphabetical order, or any other kind of logical order I can figure out. It definitely sorts numbers differently than letters, but with combinations, it just gets weird.

Anyway, I know the shot order and sorted it in Excel. Lovely tool, a spreadsheet. Won't auto-sort hex though.

It's the tedious part of filmmaking, or one of them anyway: the logistics of creating the database of information about the shots you have. It really involves fiddling with file structures, naming conventions, and eventually watching footage and taking notes as to scene, shot, actor, and other information. It's just the first round of delving into the footage, but doing it gives you at least a first blush of what you have captured, what stands out, what doesn't work, and the like. A quick sketch of notes helps when you're looking for selects later.

The happy thing is that as these come off of the hard drive and go through the stripper, each camera take is an individual file in all its own glory, so no more need to log timecode of events, just take notes of each take. scotiagirl will appreciate that, I'm sure.

The next step in this whimsical process is to do a conversion of all of these files to 1080/24P format, and unfortunately, it's a manual process. There is a batch capability on the program but it seems to be broken and makes it crash rather badly, which might still be an artifact of a crashed XP. So, convert the files, one by one... all hundred and fifty-some.

The other option is to set up one of the surplus work computers with it's own license to run the frame rate converter in batch mode, drop a network cable down, and copy the files over the network from one machine to the next. There would be some monkeying around with all of that stuff, but it might be worth it.

Bedtime now, I think.
Tags: filmmaking
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